Add Pears To Your Season Menu This Fall

One medium pear is 100 calories, has 5.5 grams of fiber, 10% of the daily value of vitamin C, and 5% of the daily value of potassium! The high pectin in pears makes them ideal for jams and spreads.

A member of the rose family, pears are delicious in both sweet and savory dishes and can be enjoyed raw, stewed, sauteed, baked, roasted, poached and grilled!

If you enjoy pears, here is a wonderful salad to share with family and friends during the Fall season!

Pear waldrof salad:

Ingredients;

4 large crisp, green pears, unpeeled, chopped into chunks

5 stalks of celery trimmed, coarsely sliced

1/2 cup golden raisins

1/2 cup walnuts

1 teaspoon grated lemon rind

1 cup low fat cottage cheese

1/4 cup plain Greek yogurt

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1 tablespoon honey

Directions:

Place chopped pears, celery, raisins, walnuts and lemon rind into a large bowl and toss together. Place cottage cheese, yogurt, lemon juice, and honey into the container of a blender and process for 2 minutes until smooth and creamy. Pour cottage cheese dressing over pear mixture and stir to combine well. Chill until serving. Serves 8 people.

Nutrition information:

Serving size: 1 cup

Calories: 182

Total fat: 6g

Sat. fat: 1g

Cholesterol: 13mg

Sodium: 147mg

Carb: 29g

Fiber: 5g

Sugars: 20g

Protein: 6g

For more information: Food and Nutrition Journal September/October 2014. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Matcha: Will It Be The Replacement of Coffee For Americans Soon?

Matcha is a powdered green tea made from crushed leaves. Matcha contains L-theanine, an amino acid that relaxes the mind. It is sold in a Japanese cafe in Brooklyn, New York where several people have reported a relaxed energy and ease on their stomachs compared to coffee. The drinks served at the cafe contain 70 milligrams of caffeine which is almost as much as a cup of coffee. The powder is also available online at www.matchabarnyc.com ($22 for a 30-gram tin which makes 20 cups)

Would you substitute this product for your coffee?

CLASSIC MATCHA TIN 30g

Photo credit: http://www.matchabarnyc.com

For more information: http://www.businessweek.com/articles/2014-10-16/matcha-americas-latest-caffeine-fix

Eggs – A High Quality Protein

Eggs seem to have a bad reputation these days. There’s always new information coming out from health professionals stating eggs are great for your health one day and are extremely bad for your health the next day. I’m here to tell you that as of now, having an egg a day will not hurt your cholesterol and there are plenty of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants found in one single egg!

Eggs make a great breakfast food. One egg contains at least 6 grams of protein. This is a high quality protein which helps you feel fuller longer. Eggs also contain Choline which aids in the body’s ability to transport nutrients in liver function and basic cell activity. Eggs have all nine essential amino acids and do not contain a long list of packaged ingredients because guess what… they’re all natural! Eggs are the least expensive form of high quality protein – 15 cents a serving! And they are only 70 calories per egg.

Are eggs a part of your daily meals? How do you like to eat your eggs? Please share below!

Photo credit: http://www.forbes.com

For more information: Health watch: Benefits of Eggs: http://www.blackhillsfox.com

Summer Squash

Squash is considered one of the oldest cultivated crops in the Western Hemisphere. It is low in calories – 1 cup contains fewer than 20 calories and it’s water content is more than 90 percent. They are excellent sources of vitamin C and potassium.

Zucchini: This is the most popular summer squash. It can be baked, fried, sauteed, grilled, steamed or shredded. It can be eaten raw or cooked!

Squash blossoms: These yellow or orange flowers can be used as a colorful garnish or can add to a mild squash flavor. You can stuff these with soft cheese and bake them or coat them in batter and lightly fry them!

Pattypan: This has a distinct saucer shape! You can slice this squash and pan fry, or scoop out the interior and stuff them.

Ronde de Nice: This French zucchini is firm and mild flavored. It is also sometimes called eight-ball squash. It is perfect for scooping out and stuffing with grains or vegetables before baking.

Yellow Crookneck: This bumpy yellow squash can be steamed, boiled, or sauteed. It is often used in soups and stews.

Source: July/August 2014: FoodandNutritionmag.org

Photo credit: www.homesteadanywhere.com

Clean Eating

Do:

1. Eat 5-6 small meals each day

2. Eat breakfast everyday within 1 hour of rising

3. Eat a combination of lean protein and complex carbohydrates

4. Eat healthy fats every day

5. Drink water often

6. Carry a cooler or bring with you to work clean foods every day

7. Vegetables and fruits should always be on your top list

8. Always be aware of your portion sizes

Don’t:

1. Over-processed foods especially white flour and sugar

2. Foods containing perservatives

3. Artificial sugars

4. Artificial foods

5. Sugar-loaded beverages

6. Excessive amounts of alcohol

7. Calorie-dense foods containing little or no nutrients

8. Super-size your meals!

Source: http://www.skinnymom.com

Strawberries, Blueberries, Raspberries, All Kinds Of Berries!

Berries deliver fiber, vitamin C and a delicious taste for summer! Berries are also a great source of phytochemicals which help defend against heart disease and cancer. Fresh berries are a diabetes-friendly fruit and also great for weight management. They are a perfect snack, great in yogurt, smoothies and cereal and even in a salad!

Cranberry: Excellent source of fiber and vitamin C. They may play a role in preventing urinary tract infections.

Blueberry: Good source of vitamin C and fiber. They contain free-radical compounds which may provide heart health and cancer-fighting benefits.

Gooseberry: High in vitamin C. They are great in sauces or jams!

Raspberry: Low in calories and high in vitamin C. They have a whole 8 grams of fiber in one cup!

Strawberry: High in vitamin C and Folate. Great to use frozen strawberries when they are not in season!

Blackberry: Excellent source of vitamin C and fiber. Great in salads, sauces and as a dessert!

Boysenberry: Provide vitamin K and are an excellent source of fiber and folate. These are slightly sweeter than raspberries!

For more information: MAY/JUNE 2014 Edition. Food and Nutrition. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Source of Photograph: atlantablackstar.com

The US Compared To Other Countries When It Comes To Food

Such a great article I came across on Buzzfeed comparing what we eat here in the United States that are BANNED from other countries. Definitely worth your time reading and definitely an eye opener!
The 8 foods mentioned here are:

  • Artificial food dyes –  have been linked to brain cancer, nerve-cell deterioration, and hyperactivity in children.
  • Olestra – robs your body of its ability to absorb vitamins
  • Brominated vegetable oil – BVO is linked to major organ system damage, birth defects, growth problems, schizophrenia, and hearing loss.
  • Potassium bromate – linked to kidney damage, cancer, and nervous system damage.
  • Azodicarbonamide – known to induce asthma.
  • BHA and BHT -known to cause cancer in rats.
  • Synthetic growth hormones rBGH and rBST – potentially causing infertility, weakened muscle growth, and a whole array of cancers.
  • Arsenic - Used in some chicken feed to make meat appear pinker and fresher, arsenic is poison, which will kill you if you ingest enough.

 

Check it out here: http://www.buzzfeed.com/ashleyperez/8-foods-we-eat-in-the-us-that-are-banned-in-other-countries

Get The Scoop On Leafy Greens!

  • Collards: An excellent source of fiber, vitamins A and K, and calcium. Since they are full of Phytochemicals, they may help prevent cancers and promote heart health!
  • Mustards: These leafy greens have a spicy, peppery flavor. They have vitamins A, C, and K, calcium, and fiber!
  • Cabbage: Full of fiber and rich in vitamins C and K. Eating cabbage regularly may help reduce the risk of certain cancers.
  • Chard: Available in several varieties, this leafy green provides vitamins A, K, magnesium, potassium, and is higher on the sodium side (315 milligrams per cup)
  • Kale: An excellent source of lutein and vitamins A, C, and K, and a good source of calcium.
  • Arugula: This peppery salad green is an excellent source of vitamin K. It can be used a spice or eaten raw as lettuce leaves!
  • Romaine: A good source of folate and vitamin K. Tearing the leaves (not cutting) avoids the release of ascorbic acid oxidase which destroys vitamin C!
  • Watercress: An excellent source of vitamins C and K. It’s a great leafy green to add to salads or added to sandwiches.
  • Spinach: Raw spinach is 91 percent water! It is an excellent source of vitamins A, C, and K, folate, potassium, and fiber. It is great cooked and raw!

What’s your favorite leafy green? Do you like eating it raw or cooked?

For more information: Leafy Greens Nutrition Rock Stars by Marisa Moore

Photo credit: microfarmgardens.com

National Nutrition Month 2014

The theme for this year’s National Nutrition Month is “Enjoy the taste of eating right!” Consumer research confirms that taste tops nutrition as the main reason why one food is purchased over another. This year’s key messages for NNM will focus on how to combine taste and nutrition to create healthy meals that follow the Dietary Guidelines recommendations.

What does this year’s slogan mean to you and your family? Is taste really the overall factor when it comes to deciding what to eat? Share your thoughts!

Visit for more details: http://www.eatright.org/NNM

Rethink Your Calories When Eating Out

This gives us all a great perspective on what we really are eating when we order from restaurants! This short video shows that it may not be a bad idea to over-estimate your caloric intake when reading nutrition information. Until the FDA makes food companies report accurate information for the public, remember to rethink what you actually are eating.