Keep Your Skin Glowing, Naturally!

“Certain foods are naturally rich in nutrients that may help keep skin healthy and even fight signs of aging. Vitamin C, beta-carotene and antioxidants found in fruits like peaches, plums and nectarines work beneath the surface to protect and rejuvenate skin from the harmful damage of ultraviolet rays. Peaches are especially rich in alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA), a key nutrient added to many age-defying cosmetics.

Watermelon, ruby red grapefruit and tomatoes are all rich in lycopene. Lycopene actually protects skin cells from the sun’s burning rays which can lead to premature aging and even skin cancer, and replenishes the cells.

Bright-colored fruits and vegetables, such as bell peppers, tomatoes, pineapple, strawberries, cantaloupe, oranges, carrots, spinach and broccoli, are your best choice for vitamins A and C. Colorful fruits and vegetables rich in vitamin C and A are important for collagen formation, which helps keep skin firm.

And don’t forget about water!! Staying hydrated keeps your skin firm and well-hydrated.”

skin

For more information: http://www.nujournal.com/page/content.detail/id/535768/Head-to-toe-healthy-glow.html?nav=5087

Sugar, Oh Honey, Honey!

I thought this would be an appropriate topic right after Halloween! Re-think your actions before you over-indulge in the bowl of candy..

Our bodies need sugar, but Americans are consuming WAY too much. Stick to non-processed foods as much as possible to avoid excessive sugars, even though this might be challenging! We are surrounded by processed foods through the media, in grocery stores, and in most of our own homes. We need to start nourishing our bodies and treating them right– not like garbage cans.

Sugar is hidden in unlikely foods, from salad dressing to crackers. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends most women get no more than 24 grams of added sugar per day. That’s about six teaspoons, or 100 calories. However, the average American woman eats about 18 daily teaspoons.

In the past four years, cereal brands have cut back on sugar, the milk industry recently lowered amounts in the chocolate milk served in schools, and Walmart is aiming for 10% less added sugar in select foods by 2015.

Sugar takes a devastating toll on your health. In fact, excessive sugar consumption may be the largest factor underlying obesity and chronic disease in America

For more information: http://www.cnn.com/2012/10/30/health/sugar-bad/index.html?hpt=he_c2  By Aviva Patz, Health.com

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2010/04/20/sugar-dangers.aspx

Reducing Your Sugars

A great article from the AHA website on reducing intake of sugar!

To figure out if a packaged food contains added sugars, and how much, you have to be a bit of a detective. On the Nutrition Facts panel, the line for sugars contains both the natural and added types as total grams of sugar. There are four calories in each gram, so if a product has 15 grams of sugar per serving, that’s 60 calories just from the sugar alone, not counting the other ingredients.

Limit your consumption of foods with high amounts of added sugars, such as sugar-sweetened beverages. Just one 12-ounce can of regular soda contains eight teaspoons of sugar, or 130 calories and zero nutrition.

To tell if a processed food contains added sugars, you need to look at the list of ingredients. Sugar has many other names. Besides those ending in “ose,” such as maltose or sucrose, other names for sugar include high fructose corn syrup, molasses, cane sugar, corn sweetener, raw sugar, syrup, honey or fruit juice concentrates.

Tips for Reducing Sugar in Your Diet:
Take sugar (white and brown), syrup, honey and molasses off the table — out of sight, out of mind!

  • Cut back on the amount of sugar added to things you eat or drink regularly like cereal, pancakes, coffee or tea. Try cutting the usual amount of sugar you add by half and wean down from there, or consider using an artificial sweetener.
  • Buy sugar-free or low-calorie beverages.
  • Buy fresh fruits or fruits canned in water or natural juice. Avoid fruit canned in syrup, especially heavy syrup.
  • Instead of adding sugar to cereal or oatmeal, add fresh fruit (try bananas, cherries or strawberries) or dried fruit (raisins, cranberries or apricots).
  • When baking cookies, brownies or cakes, cut the sugar called for in your recipe by one-third to one-half. Often you won’t notice the difference.
  • Instead of adding sugar in recipes, use extracts such as almond, vanilla, orange or lemon.
  • Enhance foods with spices instead of sugar; try ginger, allspice, cinnamon or nutmeg.
  • Substitute unsweetened applesauce for sugar in recipes (use equal amounts).
  • Try non-nutritive sweeteners such as aspartame, sucralose or saccharin in moderation. Non-nutritive sweeteners may be a way to satisfy your sweet tooth without adding more calories to your diet. The FDA has determined that non-nutritive sweeteners are safe.

 

Source: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/NutritionCenter/HealthyDietGoals/Sugars-and-Carbohydrates_UCM_303296_Article.jsp#.TtPIrFa9Z2I