Go Yogurt?

A research study has shown that  people who said they ate yogurt also reported consuming higher amounts of other good-for-you foods, such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, fish and whole grains. Yogurt is a good source of calcium, magnesium, and potassium and many Americans don’t consume enough of these nutrients. The study shows that if many consume yogurt in place of less healthy foods, it may help eliminate the inadequate intake of shortfall nutrients.

A one-cup serving of low-fat yogurt has a similar nutrition profile to that of a cup of low-fat milk, but with roughly 50 percent more potassium, calcium, and magnesium, the researchers pointed out.

What are your thoughts on this? Do you believe consuming yogurt makes you eat healthier foods?

yogurt

For more information: http://todayhealth.today.com/_news/2013/01/24/16683669-yogurt-lovers-have-better-diets?lite MyHealthNewsDaily By Cari Nierenberg

Ch-ch-ch-CHIA!

“The chia seed contains antioxidants, protein, fiber and omega-3 fatty acids – making it one of the most super of superfoods.

One tablespoon of whole chia seeds contains 60 calories, 4 grams of fiber, 2 grams of protein and 2.4 grams of omega-3. It also has 64 milligrams of calcium and 40 milligrams of magnesium. In other words, two or three tablespoons of chia equal one large egg in terms of protein, and one tablespoon of chia has the same amount of omega-3 you would get in four ounces of salmon!

The whole seed can be sprinkled on top of a variety of foods! You can use it in baking as a replacement for eggs because it has a great binding capacity. (One tablespoon of chia powder in a quarter-cup of water equals one egg). It is also gluten-free!”

Chia-Seeds-LIT

For more information: http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/wellness/chia-nutritions-new-pet-project/2012/11/27/f3ce8ad2-245f-11e2-ac85-e669876c6a24_story.html

Why Should I Incorporate Dairy Products In My Diet?

As many as half of all American women and 25 percent of men older than 50 will break a bone because of osteoporosis, don’t let this be you!

Even if you consume milk and other milk products, you’re most likely still not meeting the recommended amount that you’re supposed to be getting. especially if you’re female. Adults should aim for three servings of dairy products per day.  Research suggests that dairy foods and the nutrients they provide can shield you against weak bones, high blood pressure, possibly lead to weight loss, and prevent certain cancers. Both children and adults consume too little calcium, vitamin D, potassium and dietary fiber. Dairy products can help provide you with all of these nutrients except for fiber.

Milk and other dairy products provide calcium, protein, vitamin D, phosphorus, magnesium, and potassium that work together to help build and protect bones. Population studies suggest that consuming dairy foods lowers the risk of developing high blood pressure. Dairy products also seem to help reduce the risk of colorectal cancer!

For more information: http://www.chicagotribune.com/health/sns-201210161900–tms–premhnstr–k-h20121017-20121017,0,736385.story Written by Jill Weisenberger, M.S., R.D.

Got Milk?

There are a lot of different varieties of milk out there. It’s been shown that women drink 19 gallons of milk each year, mostly in their cereal. It is a great source of Calcium: one glass packs a quarter of the daily 1,000-milligram requirement (you should get 1,200 if you’re 51 or older).

Organic milk comes from cows raised organically, meaning they eat feed grown without chemical fertilizers and pesticides. Some experts advocate for organic milk because they believe that the synthetic growth hormone given to many conventionally raised cattle may cause health problems. However, studies have shown that there not enough evidence that shows organic is safer.

Ultra-pasteurized milk is designed to keep dairy products fresh for longer. It is heated to a higher temperature than regular, pasteurized milk (280 degrees Fahrenheit versus the usual 161). Milk that’s ultra-pasteurized isn’t any safer or more nutritious, but it could be a good pick if you’re slow to start a carton or like to buy in bulk.

Fortified milk packs extra nutrients such as Vitamin A, D, C, omega-3s and fiber! Fortified skim milk is a smart pick if you don’t like low-fat milk but want to avoid the fat and calories in whole.
Lactose-free milk is good for the 6% of Americans who can’t digest the sugar, lactose, found in dairy. If you’re lactose-intolerant, this milk can help you get the calcium and vitamin D you need without gastric distress.

Rice, soy, and other nondairy milk is more common than ever, giving vegans, the lactose intolerant, and those with no special dietary needs an alternate pour for their cereal. If you’re swapping one in for regular milk, make sure it’s fortified with calcium and vitamin D (unless it’s soy milk, which has the same amount of both nutrients as cow’s milk). If you’re a vegan look for added B12 as well.

When you pack your lunch, know the nutrition you are getting

An article by Molly Kimball who is a registered dietitian in New Orleans:

Protein: Molly recommends a portion of lean meat, fish, or poultry the size of the palm of the person who will be eating the lunch. “Palm-sized” is often about four ounces of lean meat, fish, or poultry for women, six or more ounces for men, and two or three ounces for kids. Every ounce of meat provides about seven grams of protein, so if you’re incorporating non-meat protein options such as beans, veggie burgers, cottage cheese or Greek yogurt as your protein source, check the protein content on the nutrition facts label. A veggie burger with 15 grams of protein, for example, provides the protein equivalent of two ounces of meat. A carton of Greek yogurt with 20 grams of protein is roughly equal to three ounces of meat.

Fruits and vegetables: Incorporate at least one type of antioxidant-rich vegetables and fruits with each lunch.

Healthy fats: For meals and snacks, aim to include some type of fat: nuts, seeds, nut butters, avocado, guacamole, hummus or olive oil. Just be sure to keep an eye on portion size

Calcium rich foods: This is especially important for kids and teens, since they’re in their peak years of bone-building.

Whole grains: You may opt for whole grains in the form of sandwich breads, whole wheat pasta, brown rice or sweet potatoes, or you also can get your whole grains with snack-type foods like certain crackers, chips and even cookies.

  • Triscuits. With three grams of fiber per serving, whole wheat, oil, and salt are the only three ingredients in Original Triscuits.
  • Baked Tostitos Scoops. They’re surprisingly whole grain (whole corn is the first ingredient), with two grams of fiber per serving.
  • Glenny’s Soy Crisps. These baked crisps have a taste and texture similar to mini rice cakes, but they’re higher in protein and fiber.
  • Kashi Honey Almond Flax Granola Bar. With more of Kashi’s rolled whole grain blend and roasted almonds than any other ingredient, these 140-calorie bars have seven grams of protein (the equivalent of one egg), four grams of fiber and five grams of sugar.
  • Plain Greek Yogurt – 0 percent or 2 percent fat (e.g. Chobani, Fage, & Oikos). Protein-rich with zero added sugar, they’re also a good source of probiotics, calcium and potassium.

 

For more information: http://www.nola.com/health/index.ssf/2012/09/pack_a_nutritious_lunch_with_t.html

Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian, Lacto-Vegetarian, Vegan Meal Plans

Are you a lacto-ovo vegetarian, a lacto-vegetarian or a vegan who is looking for some food options or meal plans? Some meat replacements that are useful are tofu, seitan, beans, quinoa, nuts, any soy products, eggplant, portobello mushrooms, legumes, tempeh, hummus etc.. These are all high protein foods packed with valuable nutrients. Here are some more options for you to choose from…

Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian Meal Plan (2,400 calorie diet)

Breakfast:

1/2 cup orange juice (calcium fortified)

1/2 cup cereal

1 egg

1 slice of bread

1 tsp. margarine

1 cup ( 8 oz.) milk

Lunch:

2-3 oz. meat alternative

1/2 cup potato

1/2 cup vegetable

1/2 cup-3/4 cup salad

2 tbsp. salad dressing

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit

1/2 cup (4 oz.) milk

Dinner:

2-3 oz. meat alternative

1/2 cup rice

1/2 cup vegetable

1/2-3/4 cup salad

2 tbsp. salad dressing

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit

1/2 cup (4 oz.) milk

Snack:

1/2 cup soy nuts

1/2 cup fortified tomato juice

Lacto-Vegetarian Meal Plan

Breakfast:

1/2 cup calcium fortified orange juice

1/2 cup cereal

1 egg

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1 cup (8 oz.) milk

1 cup coffee/tea

Lunch:

2-3 oz. meat alternative

1/2 cup pasta

1/2 cup vegetable

1/2 cup-3/4 cup salad

2 tbsp. salad dressing

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit

1/2 cup (4 oz.) milk

Coffee/tea

Dinner:

2-3 oz. meat substitute

1/2 cup brown rice

1/2 cup vegetable

1/2 cup-3/4 cup salad

2 tbsp. salad dressing

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit

1/2 cup milk

Snack:

1/2 cup soy nuts

1/2 cup fortified tomato juice

Vegan Meal Plan

Breakfast:

1/2 cup fortified orange juice

1/2 cup oatmeal

2 slices whole wheat bread

2 tbsp. peanut butter

1 cup fortified soy milk

2 tbsp. raisins

Lunch:

6 oz. lentil soup w/ 1/2 cup brown rice

4 sesame seed crackers

1 cup raw spinach

1/4 cup shredded carrots

2 tbsp. chopped mushrooms

2 oz. tofu

2 tbsp. low calorie dressing

1 fresh apple

1 cup fortified soy milk

Dinner:

2 burritos: 2-6 inches soft corn tortillas

1 cup pinto beans

3/4 cup shredded lettuce

1/2 cup diced tomato

2 tbsp. diced onion

1/4 cup salsa

1/2 cup broccoli

1 tbsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit cocktail

1 cup fortified soy milk

Some Information:

A lacto-ovo vegetarian restricts all dietary sources of animal protein except dairy products and eggs. This is the most common type of vegetarian diet and is the easiest to prepare.

A lacto-vegetarian diet restricts all dietary sources of animal protein except dairy products.

A vegan diet restricts all dietary sources of animal protein.

The following foods provide approximately the same amount of protein as does 1 oz. meat (7 grams protein)

  • 1/4 cup cottage cheese
  • 1 cup regular or soy milk
  • 1 oz. cheese
  • 1/3 cup mixed nuts
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp. peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup legumes
  • 1/4 cup soy beans
  • 1 oz. processed soy protein
  • 1/4 cup tofu
  • 3/4 cup yogurt

All vegetarians should ensure adequate calcium for development and maintenance of strong bones. In place of dairy products, choose abundant amounts of dark leafy greens (kale, mustard and turnip greens, collards) bok choy, broccoli, legumes, tofu processed with calcium, dried figs, sunflower seeds, and calcium fortified cereals and juice. The following foods provide approximately the same amount of calcium as does 1 cup of milk (300 mg)

  • 1 cup calcium-fortified soy milk
  • 1 2/3 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup collards
  • 3 cups cooked dried beans
  • 1 cup almonds
  • 3 pieces enriched cornbread

Iron is also important to keep in mind. When consumed along with foods rich in Vitamin C, plant sources of iron are absorbed better. Some examples of high iron foods include legumes, dark green vegetables, dried fruits, prune juice, blackstrap molasses, pumpkin seeds, soy nuts, and iron-fortified breads and cereals.

Vitamin B12 which is only found in animal foods, is not much of a concern for vegetarians who consume eggs and dairy. Vegans should include vitamin B-12 fortified foods such as fortified soymilk and commercial breakfast cereals and/or a B12 supplement in their diets. Vitamin B12 is also found in Brewer’s yeast.

The primary source of Vitamin D is found in dairy products where most are fortified with it. The other main source is sunlight exposure. Foods containing vitamin D are fortified cow’s milk, soy milk, rice milk or nut milk. Supplementation is needed for those who don’t consume milk products and/or spend little time in the sun.

Zinc can also be a concern because most zinc is found in animal foods. Wheat germ, nuts, and dried beans can all be included in your diet to help boost your zinc!