A Vegetarian Thanksgiving

Are you a vegetarian or vegan and struggle with finding meals, appetizers, and sides for Thanksgiving? Thanks to Christine Byrne (Buzzfeed Staff), here are 37 delicious vegetarian recipes! Click the link for recipes. Here’s a sneak peak for what the site offers recipes for! Sounds delicious to me!

Appetizers:

  • Sweet Potato Carrot Latkes
  • Truffled Mushroom Deviled Eggs
  • Pear, Shallot, Delicata Squash Soup
  • Mashed Potato Fritters
  • Caramelized Onion, Mushroom, and Gruyere Tartlets
  • Honey crisp Apple and Parsnip Soup

Salads:

  • Roasted Carrot and Red Quinoa Salad
  • Delicata Squash Salad with Roasted Potatoes and Pomegranate Seeds
  • Wild Rice, Farro, and Tangerine Salad
  • Roasted Carrot Salad with Arugula, Goat Cheese, and Crispy Garlic Chips
  • Ginger pear and Parsnip Salad

Sides:

  • Slow Roasted Green Beans with Sage
  • Cauliflower with Brown butter, Pears, Sage, and Hazelnuts
  • Horseradish Chive Mashed Potatoes

Condiments:

  • Vegan Mushroom Gravy
  • Cranberry Sauce with Cinnamon

Mains:

  • Winter Squash Bowl
  • Butternut Squash Lasagna and Shiitake Mushrooms
  • Pretzel Cashew Crusted Tofu with Sweet Onion Chutney
  • Caramelized Tofu and Shredded Brussels Sprouts

VEgan-thanksgiving-624x624Picture credit: www.chicagonow.com

Read more: http://www.buzzfeed.com/christinebyrne/vegetarian-dishes-for-thanksgiving

 

Veganize Yourself

After speaking to several vegan chefs and diners, Tara Parker-Pope gives the following advice on how to find easy replacements and stock up on vegan foods!

NONDAIRY MILK Taste all of them to find your favorite. Coconut and almond milks (particularly canned coconut milk) are thicker and good to use in cooking, while rice milk is thinner and is good for people who are allergic to nuts or soy.

NONDAIRY CHEESE Rather than use a packaged product, vegan chefs prefer to make homemade substitutes using cashews, tofu, miso or nutritional yeast.

NUTRITIONAL YEAST The name is unappetizing, but many vegan chefs swear by it: it’s a natural food with a roasted, nutty, cheeselike flavor.

EGGS Ms. Coscarelli, who won the Food Network’s Cupcake Wars with vegan cupcakes, says vinegar and baking soda can help baked goods bind together and rise, creating a moist and fluffy cake without eggs. Cornstarch can substitute for eggs to thicken puddings and sauces.

vegan

 

For more information: http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/01/14/how-to-go-vegan/?ref=health

Vegan/Vegetarian Video

Thought this video was something interesting to share.. Guess this woman’s age!!!! You’ll never believe it. Maybe being a vegetarian/vegan can make you feel and look younger after all! Click the link below.

Sexiest Vegetarian

“A vegan is someone who, for various reasons, chooses to avoid using or consuming animal products. While vegetarians choose not to use flesh foods, vegans also avoid dairy and eggs, as well as fur, leather, wool, and cosmetics or chemical products tested on animals. Veganism is a component of a cruelty-free lifestyle. Living vegan provides numerous benefits to animals’ lives, the environment and to our own health through a healthy diet and lifestyle”

“The United Nations has reported that a vegan diet can feed many more people than an animal based diet. Animal agriculture takes a devastating toll on the earth. It’s an inefficient way of producing food, since feed for farm animals requires land, water, fertilizer, and other resources that could otherwise have been used directly for producing human food. Animal waste from massive feedlots and factory farms is a leading cause of pollution in our groundwater and rivers. The same factory farm methods that are used to produce most meats are also used to produce most milk and eggs. Cows and chickens live short lives caged, drugged, mutilated, and do not get the freedom that they need. Even though chickens can live up to 15 years, they’re usually slaughtered when their egg production rates decline after just two years! Vegan foods, such as whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and beans, are low in fat, contain no cholesterol and are rich in fiber and nutrients. Vegans can get all the protein they need from legumes and grains, calcium from broccoli, kale, collard greens, tofu, fortified juices and soymilks, iron from chickpeas, spinach, pinto beans and soy products and B12 from fortified foods and supplements! With careful planning, a vegan diet can provide the same nutrients you can get from a regular diet! ”

For more information on a vegan diet: http://www.vegan.org/about_veganism/health.html

Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian, Lacto-Vegetarian, Vegan Meal Plans

Are you a lacto-ovo vegetarian, a lacto-vegetarian or a vegan who is looking for some food options or meal plans? Some meat replacements that are useful are tofu, seitan, beans, quinoa, nuts, any soy products, eggplant, portobello mushrooms, legumes, tempeh, hummus etc.. These are all high protein foods packed with valuable nutrients. Here are some more options for you to choose from…

Lacto-Ovo Vegetarian Meal Plan (2,400 calorie diet)

Breakfast:

1/2 cup orange juice (calcium fortified)

1/2 cup cereal

1 egg

1 slice of bread

1 tsp. margarine

1 cup ( 8 oz.) milk

Lunch:

2-3 oz. meat alternative

1/2 cup potato

1/2 cup vegetable

1/2 cup-3/4 cup salad

2 tbsp. salad dressing

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit

1/2 cup (4 oz.) milk

Dinner:

2-3 oz. meat alternative

1/2 cup rice

1/2 cup vegetable

1/2-3/4 cup salad

2 tbsp. salad dressing

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit

1/2 cup (4 oz.) milk

Snack:

1/2 cup soy nuts

1/2 cup fortified tomato juice

Lacto-Vegetarian Meal Plan

Breakfast:

1/2 cup calcium fortified orange juice

1/2 cup cereal

1 egg

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1 cup (8 oz.) milk

1 cup coffee/tea

Lunch:

2-3 oz. meat alternative

1/2 cup pasta

1/2 cup vegetable

1/2 cup-3/4 cup salad

2 tbsp. salad dressing

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit

1/2 cup (4 oz.) milk

Coffee/tea

Dinner:

2-3 oz. meat substitute

1/2 cup brown rice

1/2 cup vegetable

1/2 cup-3/4 cup salad

2 tbsp. salad dressing

1 serving bread

1 tsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit

1/2 cup milk

Snack:

1/2 cup soy nuts

1/2 cup fortified tomato juice

Vegan Meal Plan

Breakfast:

1/2 cup fortified orange juice

1/2 cup oatmeal

2 slices whole wheat bread

2 tbsp. peanut butter

1 cup fortified soy milk

2 tbsp. raisins

Lunch:

6 oz. lentil soup w/ 1/2 cup brown rice

4 sesame seed crackers

1 cup raw spinach

1/4 cup shredded carrots

2 tbsp. chopped mushrooms

2 oz. tofu

2 tbsp. low calorie dressing

1 fresh apple

1 cup fortified soy milk

Dinner:

2 burritos: 2-6 inches soft corn tortillas

1 cup pinto beans

3/4 cup shredded lettuce

1/2 cup diced tomato

2 tbsp. diced onion

1/4 cup salsa

1/2 cup broccoli

1 tbsp. margarine

1/2 cup fruit cocktail

1 cup fortified soy milk

Some Information:

A lacto-ovo vegetarian restricts all dietary sources of animal protein except dairy products and eggs. This is the most common type of vegetarian diet and is the easiest to prepare.

A lacto-vegetarian diet restricts all dietary sources of animal protein except dairy products.

A vegan diet restricts all dietary sources of animal protein.

The following foods provide approximately the same amount of protein as does 1 oz. meat (7 grams protein)

  • 1/4 cup cottage cheese
  • 1 cup regular or soy milk
  • 1 oz. cheese
  • 1/3 cup mixed nuts
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tbsp. peanut butter
  • 1/2 cup legumes
  • 1/4 cup soy beans
  • 1 oz. processed soy protein
  • 1/4 cup tofu
  • 3/4 cup yogurt

All vegetarians should ensure adequate calcium for development and maintenance of strong bones. In place of dairy products, choose abundant amounts of dark leafy greens (kale, mustard and turnip greens, collards) bok choy, broccoli, legumes, tofu processed with calcium, dried figs, sunflower seeds, and calcium fortified cereals and juice. The following foods provide approximately the same amount of calcium as does 1 cup of milk (300 mg)

  • 1 cup calcium-fortified soy milk
  • 1 2/3 cup sunflower seeds
  • 1 cup collards
  • 3 cups cooked dried beans
  • 1 cup almonds
  • 3 pieces enriched cornbread

Iron is also important to keep in mind. When consumed along with foods rich in Vitamin C, plant sources of iron are absorbed better. Some examples of high iron foods include legumes, dark green vegetables, dried fruits, prune juice, blackstrap molasses, pumpkin seeds, soy nuts, and iron-fortified breads and cereals.

Vitamin B12 which is only found in animal foods, is not much of a concern for vegetarians who consume eggs and dairy. Vegans should include vitamin B-12 fortified foods such as fortified soymilk and commercial breakfast cereals and/or a B12 supplement in their diets. Vitamin B12 is also found in Brewer’s yeast.

The primary source of Vitamin D is found in dairy products where most are fortified with it. The other main source is sunlight exposure. Foods containing vitamin D are fortified cow’s milk, soy milk, rice milk or nut milk. Supplementation is needed for those who don’t consume milk products and/or spend little time in the sun.

Zinc can also be a concern because most zinc is found in animal foods. Wheat germ, nuts, and dried beans can all be included in your diet to help boost your zinc!